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Regulations for Salvation Army Bands


In order to prevent misunderstanding, and to ensure the harmonious working of the brass bands with the various corps to which they are attached, the following regulations are to be strictly observed.

  1. None will be admitted or retained a member of any band who is not a member of the Army.
  2. All the instruments in every band are to be the property of the Army, no matter by whom they may be purchased, or through whom they may be presented. The words "Salvation Army brass band," followed by the number of the corps, must be marked on every instrument. In no case are instruments to be used to play anything but salvation music, or on any but Salvation Army service.
  3. In the event of any member of the band resigning his position as such, he will leave his instrument behind him.
  4. In no case will any committee be allowed in connection with any band.
  5. In every case the captain of the corps to which the band is attached shall direct the movements of the band, and shall appoint the bandmaster.
  6. In no case will any band, or member of any band, be allowed to go into debt, either for instruments, or anything else, connected with the band.
  7. In no case is the practice of the band, or any member of the band to interfere with the meetings of the corps.
  8. It is strongly recommended that in cases where a treasurer or secretary is required by a band, the treasurer or secretary of the corps to which it is attached shall act in that capacity.
  9. Any band that may have been, or may have formed, which does not carry out this order will not be recognized as a Salvation Army band, and must not in future be allowed to take part in the operations of the Army.
  10. Any band failing to carry out this order will at once be disbanded.


By order of the General,
W. Bramwell Booth, Chief of Staff
24th February 1881